Home News Subway sandwiches don’t meet requirements to legally be called bread, court rules

Subway sandwiches don’t meet requirements to legally be called bread, court rules

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Ireland’s highest court has ruled that Subway’s bread cannot legally be defined as such, as it contains too much sugar.

In a battle over tax breaks, the Irish Supreme Court ruled that the fast-food chain -known for claims to be “fresh” and a former spokesman who had a taste for young children- did not qualify for a tax break when it came to serving a “staple” food item.

The five-judge panel ruled that the bread’s sugar-to-flour content is roughly five times too high to qualify, and thus cannot be considered “bread.”

According to the Irish Independent, Subway sandwich dough has a sugar content of roughly 10 percent the weight of its flour content.

For a company to be taxed zero percent under the Irish Value-Added Tax Act of 1972, the weight of sugar and fat must not exceed two percent.

A six-inch piece of white Subway bread has nearly the same amount of sugar as an Oreo cookie.

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